Are Central Bank Coins the End of Financial Privacy?

As the European Union gets more serious about a digital euro, most central bank digital currencies intend to remove the anonymity of cash.

CoinDesk Insights
Oct 5, 2020 at 8:30 p.m. UTC
Updated Sep 14, 2021 at 10:04 a.m. UTC

As the European Union gets more serious about a digital euro, most central bank digital currencies intend to remove the anonymity of cash.

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This episode is sponsored by Crypto.comNexo.io and Elliptic.

Today on the Brief:

  • Markets gain as Pres. Trump’s condition stabilizes
  • SEC Chairman Clayton sees future where all stocks are tokenized
  • Uniswap had more volume than Coinbase in September 

Our main discussion: central bank coins and financial privacy.

The EU recently released a new research paper on a possible digital euro. Like many other official central bank reports, it assumes there is no possibility of an anonymous digital bank currency. NLW dissects arguments from people including JP Koning and CoinCenter’s Jerry Brito on why this shouldn’t be true.

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