Surveying the Carnage: Movies, Sports and Education in Crisis

As the COVID-19 crisis grows, some industries will recover quickly, but some won’t recover at all. In this episode we help you understand which is which.

AccessTimeIconMay 14, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. UTC
Updated Dec 11, 2022 at 7:27 p.m. UTC
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As the COVID-19 crisis grows, some industries will recover quickly, but some won’t recover at all. In this episode we help you understand which is which.

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This is the second in a series of episodes on how the economic crisis is challenging and transforming different industries. NLW looks at:

Movies:

  • Direct releases are already making more than box office counterparts
  • AMC is on the verge of bankruptcy (or buyout by Amazon) 
  • Production is on hold; even when it resumes, likely to have strict rules on how it is carried out

Sports:

  • Depending on your study, between 61% and 72% of people surveyed say they’re unlikely to go to live sporting events even after lockdowns are lifted
  • Colleges losing $18B+ in sports-related revenue 
  • eSports alternatives surging, with conversations on Twitter up 71%

Advertising:

  • Industry took eight years to recover from the Great Financial Crisis
  • Ad spending already down massively in March/April - down 38% in digital, 41% on TV, 45% on Radio, 51% on outdoor. 

Education:

  • Of public schools, only 22% are offering any live instruction 
  • Before crisis, college debt had increased 107% between 2009 and 2019
  • Since the 1980s, the cost to attend college has grown eight times the growth in wages 
  • Estimates of 15% fewer enrollments and $23 billion in lost revenue

For more episodes and free early access before our regular 3 p.m. Eastern time releases, subscribe with Apple PodcastsSpotifyPocketcastsGoogle PodcastsCastboxStitcherRadioPublicaIHeartRadio or RSS.

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