DeFi Shouldn't Be Regulated, Crypto Advocates Tell UK Regulator

The advice comes from those who participated in a forum the Financial Conduct Authority held to hear from the digital assets industry.

AccessTimeIconJun 29, 2022 at 8:57 p.m. UTC
Updated Jun 29, 2022 at 9:29 p.m. UTC

Camomile Shumba is a CoinDesk regulatory reporter based in the UK. She previously worked as an intern for Business Insider and Bloomberg News. She does not currently hold value in any digital currencies or projects.

Crypto advocates told the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), the U.K.'s financial watchdog, that decentralized finance (DeFi) shouldn't be regulated because it is too difficult to do so.

In May, the FCA hosted its first two-day CryptoSprint, where 184 industry participants from the U.K. and other countries gathered to hear the FCA's thoughts on how the industry should be regulated. Suggestions made by industry representatives – which included company executives, compliance officers and lawyers – were published on the FCA's website on Wednesday.

According to the report, some participants thought that DeFi, which describes a range of blockchain-powered financial applications designed to cut out intermediaries and centralized institutions such as banks, shouldn't be regulated because of the philosophy behind its creation.

Regulators, however, have been watching DeFi lending platforms like Celsius Network closely after it seemingly folded under pressure from the recent crypto markets downturn.

Other ideas that were raised at the CryptoSprint included using the public ledgers that underlie some cryptocurrency networks to regulate crypto markets and setting up international definitions for crypto assets.

Officials from the FCA who attended the forum included Nikhil Rathi, CEO of the regulator, David Raw, co-director of consumer and retail policy, and Jessica Rusu, chief data, information and intelligence officer.

The FCA hosted CryptoSprint as a way to engage the industry. It hasn't made any promises to create or modify regulations based on what was suggested, but for many in the U.K. crypto industry, the initiative signaled the FCA was finally starting to listen.


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Camomile Shumba is a CoinDesk regulatory reporter based in the UK. She previously worked as an intern for Business Insider and Bloomberg News. She does not currently hold value in any digital currencies or projects.

CoinDesk - Unknown

Camomile Shumba is a CoinDesk regulatory reporter based in the UK. She previously worked as an intern for Business Insider and Bloomberg News. She does not currently hold value in any digital currencies or projects.