Gibraltar Issues ICO Advisory Amid Drive Toward Blockchain Regulation

Gibraltar's financial watchdog has said it will soon put in place new regulations aimed to bring oversight to cryptocurrency exchanges.

AccessTimeIconSep 25, 2017 at 3:26 p.m. UTC
Updated Sep 13, 2021 at 6:57 a.m. UTC

The Gibraltar Financial Services Commission, the financial watchdog for the British Overseas Territory, has announced it will put in place new regulations aimed at bringing oversight to the cryptocurrency exchange sector.

In a September 22 statement, the commission said that, from January 2018, a new framework will regulate companies using blockchain to "store or transmit value belonging to others." Further, it said initial coin offerings (ICOs) might also come under regulatory oversight in the near future, with the commission explaining it is "considering a complementary regulatory framework covering the promotion and sale of tokens, aligned with the DLT framework."

Currently, ICO investment schemes are unregulated, the watchdog said, meaning investors have no recourse to any financial compensation scheme or ombudsman.

The statement cautioned the public to ensure they are aware of the "highly-speculative and risky" nature of the token sale funding method.

It reads:

"ICOs are an unregulated means of raising finance in a venture or project, usually at an early-stage and often one whose products and services have not yet been significantly designed, built or tested, yet alone made operational or generating revenue."

Over the past month, several authorities from across the world have made similar statements warning of the risks of ICO schemes. Going a step further, China issued a full ban on the funding method earlier this month, and a number of local cryptocurrency exchanges have seen fit to shutter their services as a result.

However, interest in DLT in other areas by elected authorities seems to be growing unswayed. For example, in August, the Gibraltar Stock Exchange announced plans to become the first regulated exchange to implement a blockchain for its trading and settlement systems.

Gibraltar image via Shutterstock

DISCLOSURE

Please note that our privacy policy, terms of use, cookies, and do not sell my personal information has been updated.

The leader in news and information on cryptocurrency, digital assets and the future of money, CoinDesk is a media outlet that strives for the highest journalistic standards and abides by a strict set of editorial policies. CoinDesk is an independent operating subsidiary of Digital Currency Group, which invests in cryptocurrencies and blockchain startups. As part of their compensation, certain CoinDesk employees, including editorial employees, may receive exposure to DCG equity in the form of stock appreciation rights, which vest over a multi-year period. CoinDesk journalists are not allowed to purchase stock outright in DCG.

Trending

1
CoinDesk - Unknown
Three Arrows Paper Trail Leads to Trading Desk Obscured Via Offshore Entities

As Three Arrows Capital collapsed under market pressure, its much-lesser known trading desk, TPS Capital, remained active, sources say. But a complex ownership structure might frustrate creditors' efforts to collect.

CoinDesk - Unknown
2
CoinDesk - Unknown
June Was Bitcoin’s Worst Month Ever

Plus, European crypto regulation comes into view.

CoinDesk - Unknown
3
CoinDesk - Unknown
What Traders Are Saying About Bitcoin's Biggest Monthly Loss in 11 Years

Poor macroeconomic sentiment, fears of inflation and systemic risks from the crypto market pushed the cryptocurrency below 2017’s highs.

CoinDesk - Unknown
4
CoinDesk - Unknown
Three Arrows Capital Files for Bankruptcy in New York Tied to British Virgin Islands Proceeding

A British Virgin Islands court ordered Three Arrows' BVI branch into liquidation earlier this week.

CoinDesk - Unknown