TipLink Aims for Crypto Newcomers With Google-Powered Solana Wallet

"It unlocks the rest of the world for easy onboarding," said CEO Ian Krotinsky.

AccessTimeIconJun 11, 2024 at 3:41 p.m. UTC
Updated Jun 11, 2024 at 3:43 p.m. UTC

Solana (SOL) crypto wallet startup TipLink is making a play for newcomer blockchain users with a service that cuts wallet browser extensions out of the equation.

Called TipLink Wallet Adaptor, it creates an in-browser wallet linked to a person's Google account, sidestepping the usual requirement that one set up a less-user-friendly Phantom, Solflare or other wallet before receiving any tokens.

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  • "It unlocks the rest of the world for easy onboarding," said CEO Ian Krotinsky.

    TipLink's builders are betting the workaround will have stronger appeal to the vast majority of internet users who don't have a crypto wallet, nor the knowledge or desire to set one up. Instead, they can receive a link to a wallet, login with the popular credential and go.

    That might irk the most committed of self-custody proponents, the ones for whom "not your keys, not your coins," rings loudest. But Krotinsky isn't worried about catering to that crowd. The app buries its private keys beyond easy reach to limit the possibility of users accidentally handing them to a would-be phisher, he said. Google's security protocols go a long way, especially for users who have two-factor authentication.

    "It's currently not the place users will likely store a million dollars in," Krotinsky said, adding that the team is working to add "more layers of security" over time.

    For example, TipLink works in something of a walled garden for dapps. It will only interact with programs that have been vetted to ensure they are not malicious or won't steal user funds, according to a promotional video shared with CoinDesk.

    TipLink is also spinning up a "Pro" service to help developers distribute their cryptos to hundreds or thousands of users with links via campaigns.

    Edited by Nick Baker.

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    Danny Nelson

    Danny is CoinDesk's Managing Editor for Data & Tokens. He owns BTC, ETH and SOL.