Crypto.com Tells Loan Customers in 'Excluded' Countries to Repay by March 15

Customers in “excluded jurisdictions” must close their loans before Crypto.com does it for them.

AccessTimeIconMar 8, 2022 at 5:36 p.m. UTC
Updated Mar 8, 2022 at 6:10 p.m. UTC

Danny is CoinDesk's deputy business editor. He owns BTC, ETH and SOL.

Crypto.com appears to be tightening access to its global crypto lending business, informing customers in “excluded jurisdictions” that they have until March 15 to repay their loans.

“Please be informed that Lending is no longer supported in your jurisdiction. For this reason, we are required to cancel your current loans,” the exchange told two customers, one French, one German, via emails reviewed by CoinDesk. Neither had lending accounts open with the company, they said.

Crypto.com currently blocks 41 countries from accessing its lending products, according to a blog updated today. France and Germany have been on that no-fly list for over a year. It was not immediately clear what prompted Tuesday’s email.

Representatives of the company did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

This is a developing story.

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Danny is CoinDesk's deputy business editor. He owns BTC, ETH and SOL.

CoinDesk - Unknown

Danny is CoinDesk's deputy business editor. He owns BTC, ETH and SOL.